Hong Kong Snapshot: Looking in from outside

“Dead man elected as mayor to oust unpopular woman.” This minor headline is on page 11 of today’s South China Morning Post, one of Hong Kong’s English language newspapers. A candidate for the office died of a heart attack a week before the election. Surprisingly, he was kept on the ballot by members of local government, who did not want the man’s female opponent to win. The deceased man defeated the woman, 268 to 85, and the city’s four aldermen will now appoint his successor.
Legal? Presumably. But unorthodox, even a corrupt abuse of power? Seemingly.
I do like to practice what we preach – ladder of inference, yada yada, continual efforts to be aware of how my own perceptions and assumptions affect what I believe to be right and true. As culturally open as I try to be, it’s hard not to jump to conclusions about a system that would allow this to happen. What’s your reaction?
PS: If you didn’t happen to see this article, here’s the rest of the story: it took place in Tracy City, Tennessee.

“Dead man elected as mayor to oust unpopular woman.”

Morning paper (and tea)

Morning paper (and tea)

This minor headline appeared on page 11 of today’s South China Morning Post, the English language newspaper that shows up in my hotel room. The article describes that a candidate for the office died of a heart attack a week before the election. He was, however, kept on the ballot by members of local government, who did not want the man’s female opponent to win. The deceased man defeated the woman 268 to 85, and the city’s four aldermen will now appoint his successor.

Legal? Apparently. But unorthodox, even corrupt? Seemingly.

Anti-corruption poster, subway tunnel, Tsim Sha Tsui station

Anti-corruption poster, subway tunnel, Tsim Sha Tsui station

I do like to practice what we preach – ladder of inference, yada yada, continual efforts to be aware of how my own perceptions and assumptions affect what I believe to be right. As culturally open as I try to be, however, it’s hard not to jump to conclusions about a system that would allow this to happen.

What’s your reaction?

PS: As I read further, I discovered the rest of the story – and if you didn’t happen to see it yourself, here it is: this all took place in Tracy City, Tennessee. Yep. USA.